Hot Press
Cook & Tell: Recipes and Stories from Southern Kitchens
(Food and the American South)

by Johnathon Scott Barrett

Johnathon Scott Barrett, a seventh generation Georgian, like any son of the South, thoroughly enjoys good company, delicious food, fine libations and engaging conversation. These hallmarks of good living are all found in Barrett’s latest food memoir, “Cook & Tell: Recipes and Stories from Southern Kitchens” (Food and the American South).

Barrett takes readers on yet another delicious sojourn in his latest work, a moveable feast across Dixie showcasing the incredible food created in the homes of the South and the resulting tales that accompany those heartwarming dishes.

“Cook & Tell” has been described as a culinary love letter to Barrett’s parents and to the community that raised him and is dedicated in loving memory of his dear friend, Amy Allyn Swann.

“Cook & Tell” makes stops to such food-rich cities as Savannah and Nashville, as well as the small hamlets of Millingport, N.C., and Nanafalia, Ala., where farm-to-table food still has a prominent spot on the dining table.

In this warm and engaging anthology, Barrett includes not only his own entertaining stories and meaningful recipes but also those of friends he met along the way. Some accounts come from family and hometown cooks, while others are from award-winning chefs and authors.

Cook & Tell is a collection of remembrances preserving the South’s rich intersection of foodways, oral histories and delectable recipes for everything from caramel cake to pimento cheese and BBQ to biscuits.

Cook & Tell is now available to order at www.barnesandnoble.com or www.amazaon.com.

      

Kenny George Band:
Borrowed Trouble release

Inspired by the sounds of the burgeoning Americana movement, Kenny George (lead guitar, vocals and songwriter), Center Ely (steel guitar), Brooks Andrews (bass) and Scott Rankin (rhythm guitar and harmony vocals) have created an indelible impression with fans throughout the Southeast and Midwest by playing 250 shows in the last two years alone. In support of the band’s self released album Borrowed Trouble, KGB will be performing Nov. 2 at Stillwater Taproom. These performances will mark the band’s first shows since the recent loss of drummer Bucky Brown. Explosive live performances have carried the band to the brink of a breakout and they have been voted South Carolina’s Artist to Watch by South Carolina Music Guide.

www.kennygeorgeband.com                              

 


 

Beware What You Ask Of A Fairy
Oct 24th—28th

An original musical by Storyland Theatre, celebrating 30 years at the Maxwell Performing Arts Theatre. Book & lyrics by
Richard Davis, Jr., music by Susan Burgess. Meet the actors
for autographs and photos after the show.

For show times and more information call (706) 736-3455 or visit www.storylandtheatre.org.

 


 

GETAWAYS

Nashville

As a gateway to the South, Nashville, Tenn., has hit its stride and 2017 looks to be a banner year. The iconic Ryman Auditorium celebrates its 125th anniversary with a calendar full of festivities, the Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum celebrates 50 years and The Bluebird Cafe turns 35.

Why Go:

Although Nashville is known as the center of the country music industry, earning it the nickname “Music City, U.S.A,” there is a lot more to see and do these days than visit the Grand Ole Opry. The next time you’re looking to take advantage of a three-day weekend, consider Nashville, a fun city with its own quintessential charm, unique character and a wide variety of activities and attractions.

What to Explore:

Nashville is a community of creatives, composed of cutting-edge fashion designers, artisans and tastemakers.

With the largest concentration of independent fashion designers per capita outside of New York City and Los Angeles, Nashville neighborhoods are chock-full of unique boutiques and shops, including Emerson Grace, Judith Bright, Savant Vintage and Hey Rooster General Store.

Music shops such as Grimey’s New & Preloved Music are a plenty and at the Johnny Cash Museum, you can wander the world’s largest collection of artifacts and memorabilia of the “Man in Black.” Honky-tonk on Second Avenue at Robert’s Western World or stay in the Gulch for bluegrass at The Station Inn. Spend two hours at the Frist Museum for Visual Arts (which used to be Nashville’s central post office), try a one-stop beer tour of and head to the Filling Station in East Nashville or have a cocktail at the hotel bar at L.A. Jackson.

Where to Stay:

Thanks to a recent hotel boom­, The Westin and Thompson recently debuted in Nashville.

Kimpton Aertson Hotel sways to a different tune in Music City. Located in Midtown, locals and travelers alike unwind amid artistry and academia, cuisine and cocktails and enjoy an inside view of Nashville just beyond the glow of storied honky tonks and neon signs.

Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center is a beautiful floral hotel with 3,000 rooms and more than nine acres of enclosed gardens.

If you are staying in the cultural epicenter of East Nashville, the Urban Cowboy B&B is a high-design, next-gen bed-and-breakfast. With lively lounges, retro-chic suites and claw-foot tubs in a funky, southwestern-themed guesthouse, you are guided by one fundamental principle during your stay: “Have a good time!” If you prefer a quieter place, check into the 124-room Union Station, a refurbished train depot with a grand stained-glass ceiling in its lobby.

What to Eat:

Nashville is booming with new upcoming eateries. Eat hot chicken from Hattie B’s or for Caribbean-inspired tapas, book a table at the sleek new Little Octopus. For fresh seafood in a lively environment, have dinner at Fin & Pearl, or if you’re visiting between Wednesday and Saturday, head over to Bastion in the Wedgewood-Houston neighborhood for a signature cocktail and dinner at its hidden private dining room.

Foodies also do not want to miss Proper Bagel in the Belmont area, Puckett’s in the village of Leiper’s Fork and ACME Feed & Seed on Broadway where industrial gets seriously swank. With 22,000 square feet, four floors and 60 foot ceilings, ACME Feed & Seed is the place to be.

If you’re eating on the cheap, try Dino’s. This great old dive has character and charm—not to mention a famous burger, served with fries and a Miller High Life pony for 10 bucks. If last night’s shenanigans has left you famished, grab some grub at Biscuit Love Gulch, known for the best hangover food ever.

 


 

Herend Artist Event
Design Images & Gifts Hosts Exclusive Herend Artist Event on Oct. 23 from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m at Surrey Center, 459 Highland Ave.

Herend began earning worldwide fame for its exquisite porcelain soon after its founding in 1826 and today is the largest European manufactory of handcrafted, hand painted porcelain.

As one of only 10 U.S. retailers handpicked to host the Herend Artist Event, Design Images & Gifts will celebrate this landmark occasion by featuring gallery-worthy porcelain with Herend master painter Marianna Steigervald.

Customers can anticipate a stunning array of magnificent designs, novel show colors and captivating shapes. This year’s featured piece, created specifically for the event, is a pair of porcelain pelicans in Herend’s classic fishnet pattern hand painted in a rich combination of blues, terra-cotta and a palette of complementary colors. Steigervald has been with Herend for more than 20 years and 2017 marks her fourth U.S. artist event tour. One of the manufactory’s few master artists, Steigervald has built a loyal U.S. following of Herend aficionados who look forward to her visits year after year.

Design Images & Gifts is a full service interior design firm and retail store that provides classic and mod home decor, china, gifts, fine linens, bridal registry and is the only authorized Herend dealer in the area.

Call (706) 736-5501 or visit www.designimagesaugusta.com for more information.

 


 

Dannette & Jeannette Millbrook
THE FALL LINE PODCAST

The Fall Line Podcast is a true crime audio serial focusing on marginalized communities in Georgia. The first season investigates the March 18, 1990 disappearance of Augusta, Ga. twins Dannette and Jeannette Millbrook. The twins, who were 15 at the time of their disappearance, were treated without cause as runaways and their case was closed less than a week after their 17th birthday.

The Millbrook family worked tirelessly to reopen the case and finally managed to attract the notice of a newly elected sheriff, Richard Roundtree in 2013.

Reports concluded that shortly after the twins disappearance, someone in the police department closed their missing persons case and removed them from the national database.  The family was never told about this, and no trail was left as to who had taken this action, or why.

Over the next several years, the Millbrooks attempts to check on the status of their case were ignored and it wasn’t until their younger sister Shanta Sturgis started badgering the police department incessantly that Sheriff Roundtree finally agreed to look into it. Roundtree discovered that the case had been closed since 1991.

Now, The Fall Line Podcast works to amplify the voices of the twins’ family and to uncover facts, explore and dispel rumors and develop theories in their case. The Fall Line tells the story of the twins, the closing and reopening of the case and the family’s struggles with finding the missing teens.

Listen as Atlanta podcasters Brooke Hargrove and Laurah Norton take a look into the family’s cold case and work to find Dannette and Jeannette Millbrook.

Available at www.thefalllinepodcast.com      

Article appears in the October 2017 issue of Augusta Magazine.

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